News

“The entire Massachusetts AFL-CIO community mourns the loss of Worcester Firefighter, Christopher Roy, who died heroically in the line of duty Sunday, December 9th.

This Midterm Election working people made our voices heard and labor-endorsed candidates across Massachusetts and the country won!

Labor has always held electoral power, especially when wielded by women. Former Secretary of Labor Francis Perkins’s lifelong dedication to workers’ rights was sparked by witnessing the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire of 1911, in which 146 people — predominantly young Jewish immigrant women — died, most as a result of locked factory doors. Though they shunned the ballot box, legendary political radicals like Lucy Parsons, Emma Goldman, and Elizabeth Gurley Flynn were all labor organizers.

The Massachusetts AFL-CIO offers its most heartfelt thoughts and prayers to the communities of Lawrence, Andover and North Andover in the wake of the devastating gas fires. Our gratitude and admiration are with all the first responders – the firefighters, EMTs, police officers and other emergency workers - for their quick, coordinated response in this unprecedented emergency.

Our hearts especially go out to the family of Leonel Rondon and to all those who were injured or displaced.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Media Contact:

Laura Wareck | [email protected] | 978-660-9587

 

Massachusetts AFL-CIO Executive Council Calls on National Grid President Marcy to Resign from Blue Cross Blue Shield MA Board

In a letter to BCBS, AFL-CIO highlights Reed’s “unethical” actions and conflict of interest after National Grid locks out 1,200 employees and terminates their BCBS health insurance

 

Labor union leaders Liz Shuler and Mary Kay Henry discuss how they rose up through the union ranks and what they’re trying to do to increase the number of women in the labor movement. Shuler, secretary-treasurer of the AFL-CIO, and Henry, president of the Service Employees International Union, also weigh in on recent Supreme Court decisions, Brett Kavanaugh's nomination, and what that all means for the future of the labor movement.

Listen to the full episode.

As Labor Day approached, the movement that created the holiday flexed its muscle in Seattle, where the landscape has been transformed in the last few years by labor-backed measures protecting and compensating people like in few other places across the country.

President Donald Trump has presented himself as a champion of the American worker and vowed to restore factory jobs.

For generations America’s promise has been that opportunity to create a better life for your family awaits if you work hard and play by the rules. But this Labor Day, that promise is more out of reach than ever for an increasing number of people.

It's 1929, and workers in the Loray Mill in Gastonia have unanimously decided to strike after work conditions in the mill have gotten worse over time, thanks to management's efforts to reduce operating costs.

Wanting livable wages, better hours, union recognition and to rid the mill of the stretch-out system that was crushing their ability to effectively complete their jobs, 1,800 workers walked out on their jobs on April 1.