Massachusetts AFL-CIO

The role of the Massachusetts AFL-CIO is to serve as the unified voice of all organized workers in the Commonwealth and to be a voice for all working people, those in unions and those not yet organized. Our mission is to improve the lives of working families—by working for economic, social and racial justice in the workplace, in our communities, our state and in our nation. Our vision is of a fair and just society that benefits all working people, not a system that’s rigged in favor of the wealthy few.

“The entire Massachusetts AFL-CIO community mourns the loss of Worcester Firefighter, Christopher Roy, who died heroically in the line of duty Sunday, December 9th.

This Midterm Election working people made our voices heard and labor-endorsed candidates across Massachusetts and the country won!

On Wednesday, October 3rd, 1,500 Marriott International workers walked off the job at the seven Boston hotels managed by the Marriott Corporation.

Recent News

Teachers overwhelmingly approved a new contract Tuesday and planned to return to the classroom after a six-day strike over funding and staffing in the nation’s second-largest school district.

Although all votes hadn’t been counted, preliminary figures showed that a “vast supermajority” of some 30,000 educators voted in favor of the tentative deal, “therefore ending the strike and heading back to schools tomorrow,” said Alex Caputo-Pearl, president of United Teachers Los Angeles.

Eight hundred thousand workers. That is the number of government employees and contractors impacted by President Trump’s shutdown of the federal government. The average take home pay of impacted workers is around $500 per week, and any financial uncertainty is sure to cause stress and anxiety over how to make ends meet. Each day of this manufactured crisis, working families lose money for housing, healthcare and groceries — the essentials we need to get by.

Furloughed federal employees and out-of-work contractors greeted one another Thursday with a sarcastic nickname that, on the 20th day of a partial government shutdown, captured their feeling of powerlessness: “Hello, fellow pawns.”

They shouted it to one another over the brutal wind and bitter cold on Thursday in downtown Washington, where hundreds gathered to demand government leaders put an end to the shutdown and allow them to get back to work.

1. Janus dealt a heavy blow to labor—but public-sector unions didn’t crumble overnight.

In June, the Supreme Court issued its long-awaited ruling in Janus v. AFSCME—and it was just as bad as everyone feared. In a 5-to-4 decision, the court found that public-sector unions violated the First Amendment by collecting so-called fair-share fees from workers who aren’t union members but benefit from collective bargaining regardless.

Take Action

It’s been nearly six months since National Grid locked 1,250 skilled gas workers out of their jobs and cut them off from their health insurance. Now these workers are in serious danger of losing the only source of income keeping their families afloat: Unemployment Insurance. National Grid wants to force families into economic insecurity in order to enhance their bargaining leverage. We can’t let that happen – here’s how you can help: Take a minute to call and email your State Senator and State Representative, and let them know that families are depending on them to extend their Unemployment Insurance benefits throughout the winter by passing H.3133 & S.1028 “An Act to Protect Locked Out Employees.”


Use this form to send an email to your legislators. Feel free to personalize the text. Please take a minute to call as well.

Tell Congress to repeal the tax cuts for the wealthy and corporations instead of cutting the vital programs that benefit nearly one-third of the U.S. population.