News

Statement on the end of the 2019 UFCW Stop & Shop Worker Strike
MA AFL-CIO President, Steven A. Tolman

Taxpayers are scrambling to make last-minute payments due to the Internal Revenue Service in just four days, but many of the country’s largest publicly-held corporations are doing better: They’ve reported they owe absolutely nothing on the billions of dollars in profits they earned last year.

31,000 members of the United Food and Commercial Workers (UFCW) who work at Stop & Shop across New England are on strike.  Since the petition to show your supports!

STRIKE ALERT:

As of 1pm on Thursday April 11th, 31,000 Stop & Shop workers, members of the United Food and Commercial Workers (UFCW), across New England are on strike.  Stop & Shop’s foreign-owned parent company reported more than $2 billion in profits last year. Yet Stop & Shop is proposing drastic cuts to the wages and benefits that its workers and their families depend on to live.

STIRKE ALERT: As of 1pm, Thursday April 11th 31,000 Stop & Shop workers across New England are on strike! Despite multi-billion-dollar profits, the company is attempting to enforce takebacks that hurt workers and their families. Stand in solidarity and remind your friends and family not to cross the picket.

Head to your nearest Stop & Shop and show our union family in UFCW support! Grab a sign and hold the line!

In 2018, women once again came home with over 16% less money in their paychecks. Tuesday is Equal Pay Day, which means women had to work until April 2—92 days longer—to be paid the same amount as a comparable man in 2018.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi suggested Tuesday that President Trump must reopen talks with Canada and Mexico to tighten enforcement provisions in a proposed North American trade deal, casting renewed doubt on prospects for congressional ratification of the accord.

APRIL 01, 2019 - The Boston Globe 

When an organization has “transparency” as part of its mission statement, it should walk the walk, no? It should actually be transparent.

However, the Massachusetts Fiscal Alliance — which has not been shy about weighing in on political issues and candidates — has been anything but transparent about the source of its funds. And with the setting up of a separate nonprofit — a further buffer against any kind of openness — it is now headed for the hypocrites hall of fame.